After much input from the QajaqUSA.org forum I heavily modified my foam masik this weekend. I started by taking my existing masik and gluing a thin sheet of minicell foam on top protruding aft, this paralleled the deck and allowed me to later attach the “clip”. I used contact adhesive throughout the job which I have found exceedingly effective for bonding minicell foam. Once the “deck” was glued to the top of the masik I held it in place in the kayak and drew the shape of the cockpit coaming onto the top surface. I then shaped a 2 inch thick arc to match the inside of the cockpit and glued it into place  on the oppositeside of the “deck” to the masik. This arc was to be the clip that prevents the masik sliding forward. I then again held the masik in place in the cockpit and drew along the top of the arc to get the profile of the top edge of the cockpit coaming as I wanted the clip to be the maximum height but not to foul my tuilik or spray skirts. I shaped the top of the clip and smoothed the edges, and rounded all the corners with Dragon Skin (metal sandpaper). Next I trimmed the aft end of the thin foam deck to the back of the clip arc and the back of the existing masik. I took the opportunity to reduce the width of the masik, previously to keep it in place I had used one about 4 inches fore and aft, I reduced this dimension to two inches and smoothed the new corners. I then took this revised model for a test paddle. After about 20 minutes it slipped forward again. I found that when my legs were fully relaxed in the bottom of the hull the clip was not sufficient to prevent the masik from dropping and then sliding forward along my thighs. To remedy this I cut a large section of industrial strength Velcro and a small section. I attached the small section to the new masik just in front of the clip and placed the large section under the deck just in front of the cockpit. I used a smaller section on the masik as I wanted it to peel off easily when wanted… I have found that large sections hold on so well they are likely to just pull the adhesive off. With this modification the masik worked well, surviving 90 minutes of rolling and paddling without moving. When I finally exited the kayak I left the masik in place… to my surprise I was able to get out without disturbing it – which brings to light the possibility of a permanent masik…. more to come on that idea.

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Lake rolling

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